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Boating Alerts & Notices: 2010

 


12/21/2010

Safety Alert from USCG concerning a Type I PFD



12/21/2010

Weather Alert, 12/21: San Diego Area:
Boaters urged to remember safety during hazardous weather




December 21, 2010



SAN DIEGO December 20, 2010 —The Coast Guard is urging mariners to exercise extreme caution through the next couple of days when venturing on or near the water due to a special weather statement the National Weather Service issued Monday morning, Dec. 20.

Heavy rainfall and strong winds are expected for San Diego County coastal areas beginning the afternoon of Monday Dec. 20 and continue until Wednesday Dec. 22.

The hazardous weather outlook issued this morning is in effect for shoreline areas and coastal waters from Laguna Niguel, Calif., south to the border of Mexico. These areas can expect heavy rain with the winds gusting up to 30 miles per hour on Wednesday, according to the National Weather Service. A flash flood watch has also been issued for a majority of the Southern California region and will be in effect from noon Monday to the afternoon of Wednesday.

Mariners are urged to check that all of their safety equipment is on board and in good condition before going underway. This includes a properly fitted personal flotation device for everyone aboard, navigation lights, distress signals and a fire extinguisher. Safety equipment requirements vary by size and type of vessel, for more information visit: http://www.uscgboating.org/.

In addition to required distress signals, boaters are strongly encouraged to have a VHF marine radio on board to monitor weather conditions, communicate with other mariners and call for help in the event of an emergency.

For the National Weather Service advisories, click the following link:

http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?zoneid=CAZ043&zflg=1



12/16/2010

Weather Alert, 12/16: Northern California:
Coast Guard, California
Department of Boating and Waterways, National Weather Service urge boaters to practice caution during heavy weather


Contact:  LTJG Laura Williams,
Laura.m.Williams@uscg.mil,
(415) 748-0112

December 16, 2010



SAN FRANCISCO—The Coast Guard, Department of Boating and Waterways (DBW), and the National Weather Service urge members of the public to exercise safe and responsible boating practices during the upcoming heavy weather this weekend.

High seas, strong winds and wide spread rain are predicted for Northern California starting Friday, continuing through the weekend and into the next week.

There will be strong southerly winds increasing throughout the day on Friday until they reach 20-30 kts with pockets of gale force winds reaching 40 kts Friday evening, said National Weather Service Marine Forecaster Charles Bell.

The waves of 5-8 feet will be from both the South and the North.  This will cause a confused sea state which can be extremely hazardous for any boater or swimmer.

Weather and wave forecasts should be checked prior to getting underway. Listen to the NOAA Weather Radio or go to http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/mtr for the latest updates.  Wave forecasts can also be found at http://www.dbw.ca.gov.

The Coast Guard and DBW strongly recommend that individuals avoid taking to the water during storm conditions.  If it is necessary to get underway, mariners are urged to check all of their safety equipment to ensure it is in good condition and working properly.

Vessel owners and operators are also encouraged to check the status of mooring and anchoring arrangements.  During strong winds and heavy seas, vessels can break free from moorings, often a result of worn lines, an insufficient numbers of lines, or an improperly sized anchor and/or anchor chain.  Adrift vessels pose severe hazards to nearby people and vessels as they are tossed about, and can also pose environmental risks as any fluids or chemicals aboard can spill or leak.  The Coast Guard and DBW urge vessel owners and operators to take extra precautions in anticipation of the forecasted storm system by addressing mooring safety and securing potential sources of marine pollution.

USCG Storm Center: www.uscg.mil/news/stormcenter

NOAA Marine Weather from Fort Bragg to Piedras Blancas, CA http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/mtr/

USCG Safe Boating: www.uscgboating.org

Wave forecasts and California boating laws: www.dbw.ca.gov



12/07/2010

Coast Guard, National Weather Service urge boaters to practice caution during heavy weather


Contact:  Sector San Francisco Public Affairs,
(415) 740-4364

December 7, 2010



SAN FRANCISCO—The Coast Guard and the National Weather Service caution members of the public in coastal locations in Northern California to exercise safe and responsible boating practices, and to keep beach safety guidelines in mind as high seas, moderate winds and rain are predicted to impact the San Francisco Bay Area, starting Wednesday and continuing into the weekend.

The swells will be out of the northwest while the winds will be out of the south creating mixed seas which can be especially dangerous.

“Large waves approaching California will produce hazardous conditions in the surf zone as the waves rapidly increase Tuesday night and peak on Wednesday,” said National Weather Service Meteorologist Christine Riley. “Waves of 12 to 15 feet from the northwest will create dangerous surf conditions and strong rip currents. Mariners should exercise caution.  Series of larger waves can surprise even the most experienced mariner and beachgoer causing disorientation, injury or even death.”

Please listen to the NOAA Weather Radio or go to http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/mtr for the latest updates.  The weather forecast should be checked prior to getting underway.

The Coast Guard reminds people to avoid going near low-lying beach and other coastal areas including jetties and rocky areas during heavy weather.  Large waves can quickly and unexpectedly sweep a person from these areas.  Even the strongest swimmers can be overtaken by the sea, especially when cold-water temperatures are factored in.

The Coast Guard strongly recommends that individuals avoid taking to the water during storm conditions.  If it is necessary to get underway, mariners are urged to check all of their safety equipment to ensure it is in good condition and working properly.

The Coast Guard also encourages all vessel owners and operators to check the status of mooring and anchoring arrangements.  The winds are forecasted to be out of the south.  During strong winds and heavy seas, vessels can break free from moorings, often a result of worn lines, an insufficient numbers of lines, or an improperly sized anchor and/or anchor chain.  Adrift vessels pose severe hazards to nearby people and vessels as they are tossed about, and can also pose environmental risks as any fluids or chemicals aboard can spill or leak.  The Coast Guard urges vessel owners and operators to take extra precautions in anticipation of the forecasted storm system by addressing mooring safety and securing potential sources of marine pollution.

USCG Storm Center: www.uscg.mil/news/stormcenter

NOAA Marine Weather from Fort Bragg to Piedras Blancas, CA http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/mtr/

USCG Safe Boating: www.uscgboating.org



11/24/2010

DBW Reminds Boaters to Boat Safely During the Off-Season


Contact:  Gloria Sandoval (916) 651-5692

November 24, 2010



Images

SACRAMENTO— The California Department of Boating and Waterways (DBW) reports that boating fatalities are more likely to occur during the off-season than the summer months. Last year, over half of boating fatalities in California occurred between October and April. Checking weather reports and wave conditions, not boating alone, wearing a life jacket, making sure vessels are appropriate for water conditions and filing a float plan are important precautions to ensure a safe voyage.

“Less congested waterways make boaters think they’re less likely to be involved in a deadly accident,” stated DBW’s Acting Director Lucia Becerra. “The reality is that boaters are at risk anytime safety precautions are ignored.”

Over 75 percent of boating fatalities in the 2009 off-season involved capsizing, boaters falling overboard or vessels flooding or swamping. The most common factors contributing to these fatal boating accidents include:

  • Not wearing a life jacket
  • Wearing heavy clothes
  • Boating alone, at night or in bad weather
  • Boat size or type is not appropriate for water conditions
  • Not paying attention to vessel’s position in the surf line

Taking adequate precaution starts with the simple use of a life jacket.  Many people mistakenly believe that knowing how to swim is enough protection from drowning in a boating accident.  Statistics reveal a different picture.  80 percent of people who drown in boating accidents know how to swim.  The most common reasons for drowning despite swimming ability are injury, cramps, poor health, panic and heavy clothes. Personal flotation devices are available in comfortable styles such as inflatable jackets. The flotation they provide can offset the drag of winter clothing.

For more information on life jackets or off-season boating tips, please visit www.BoatSmarter.com.



10/12/2010

Suisun Marsh Salinity Control Gates
Operations for 2010-2011



October 12, 2010


The California Department of Water Resources advises that it will operate the boat locks at the Salinity Control Structure, located 2.2 nautical miles from the easterly end of Montezuma Slough at coordinates, 38 05’36”N121 53’07”W, starting October 12, 2010 through May 31, 2011, contingent on hydrologic conditions.

From October 12, 2010, the flashboards will be in place across the maintenance channel, thus vessels can only pass through the boat lock.  A boat lock operator will be on duty every day from October 12 through May 31, or until further notice.

The boat lock signal is a standard traffic light.  Whistle signals to request opening are two prolonged blasts followed by two short blasts.  Channel 13 VHF-FM will be monitored during hours of operation.  Full instructions on passage including an emergency phone number are posted on site.

The boat lock is located on the east side of the channel and provides the following clearances: 16 feet horizontally; 9 feet over the sill at MLLW; 70 feet in length between sector gates; and no vertical impairment.  The piers will be marked by fixed red lights, and other parts of the structure by fixed yellow lights.

Mariners should be aware a shoal area exists along the east bank on both sides of the structure extending approximately 50 feet out from the existing levee.  Marker buoys have been placed to identify the area.  Mariners are also advised that the Salinity Control Structure operations can at times create currents at the site greater than currents in other areas of Montezuma Slough.



09/03/2010

Labor Day Boaters Urged to Remain Watchful for Quagga/Zebra Mussels

Contacts:

Gloria Sandoval, Department of Boating and Waterways, (916) 715-1657 (cell)
Troy Swauger, Department of Fish and Wildlife, (916) 322-8932
Roy Stearns, Department of Parks and Recreation, (916) 654-2270
Pete Weisser, Department of Water Resources, (916) 653-3350
Steve Lyle, Department of Food and Agriculture, (916) 654-0462
Gary Chancey, U.S. Forest Service, Region 5, (707) 562-9004

September 3, 2010


SACRAMENTO – California’s multi-agency invasive species taskforce cautions watercraft users this Labor Day to guard against spreading the aquatic Quagga and Zebra mussels to uncontaminated waters. Inspections will be conducted at launch sites on most major freshwater lakes. Watercraft and all equipment that comes into contact with the water must be clean, drained and dry.

The taskforce is comprised of California departments of Fish and Wildlife, Water Resources, Parks and Recreation, Boating and Waterways, and Food and Agriculture. Federal partners include U.S. Forest Service, Fish and Wildlife Service, Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation.

“The vigilance of boaters and watercraft owners has been the key in prohibiting the widespread invasion of these mussels into California,” said Susan Ellis, Department of Fish and Wildlife's statewide coordinator of invasive species. “Since 2007, no new population of mussels has been discovered that traces back to hitchhiking aboard watercraft or trailers. The state’s responsible boaters are commended for taking the steps necessary to prevent the spread of these mussels, averting the environmental and economic disaster these mussels can cause.”

The taskforce reminds boaters that moving watercraft is the primary threat of transporting the mussels. Anyone who accesses freshwater aquatic environments should take the following steps:

  • Inspect all exposed surfaces—small mussels feel like sandpaper to the touch
  • Wash the hull of each watercraft thoroughly; preferably with high pressure/hot water
  • Remove all plants and animal material
  • Drain all water and dry all areas
  • Drain and dry the lower outboard unit
  • Clean and dry all live-wells
  • Empty and dry any buckets
  • Dispose of all bait in the trash
  • Wait five days and keep watercraft dry between launches into different fresh waters

Boat owners who fail to follow the rules on inspections will be turned away. If the vessel carries the mussels, the owners risk quarantine. In August, a Southern California man was fined $5,000 by the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency’s legal committee after ignoring boating rules designed to stop the spread of Quagga and other aquatic invasive species.

Quagga and Zebra mussels range from microscopic to the size of a fingernail. They are prolific breeders and attach themselves to hard and soft surfaces, such as boats and aquatic plants. They adversely affect boaters by:

  • Ruining engines by blocking the cooling system—causing the engine to overheat
  • Increasing drag across the bottom of the vessel, reducing speed and wasting fuel
  • Clogging and jamming a boat’s steering equipment
  • Requiring time and money for scraping and repainting of boat bottoms
  • And colonizing all underwater substrates such as boat ramps, docks, lines and other underwater surfaces requiring constant cleaning

The establishment of an invasive mussel population wreaks havoc with the environment, disrupting the natural food chain and releasing toxins that affect other species. Spread of the Quagga could result in millions of dollars in damage to water transport facilities.

These invasive mollusks were first detected in California in January 2007, in Lake Havasu on the Colorado River. Quagga mussels were discovered a few months later in water delivered by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and the San Diego County Water Authority. Both systems draw from the Colorado River.

Thus far, the mussels have not been found in California's State Water Project (SWP), which draws from northern California watersheds. Environmental scientists are monitoring the system, the largest water and power system in the United States. The main risk of mussel introduction in the SWP is from boats carried by trailers.

For more information on the Quagga mussel response, visit the DFG webpage at www.dfg.ca.gov/invasives/quaggamussel



07/01/2010

DBW Urges Boaters to Boat Safely Over the Fourth of July Weekend


Contact:  Gloria Sandoval (916) 651-5692
cell (916) 715-1657

July 1, 2010



Videos
Images

SACRAMENTO - Boating accidents during the three summer holiday weekends represent between 15 to 20 percent of all accidents in a given year. This year five fatalities occurred during the week leading up to Memorial Day weekend. With the upcoming Fourth of July holiday, the Department of Boating and Waterways (DBW) urges boaters to boat safely.

"Waterways will be crowded this weekend with boaters who want to have fun with family and friends," stated DBW's Acting Director Lucia Becerra. "Unfortunately, this congestion along with rivers running faster and colder this summer and reservoir water levels being higher from previous years will lead to accidents, injuries and fatalities."

DBW wants boaters to remember certain boating safety tips to increase their chances of survival.

  • Prepare for the worst, wear a life jacket
    • Of the 49 boating fatalities in 2009, 53 percent drowned. Of that group, 73 percent were not wearing life jackets.
    • Life jackets can provide some thermal protection against the onset of hypothermia and keep you afloat until someone else can rescue you.
    • Knowing how to swim is one of the most common reasons given for not wearing a life jacket and gives boaters a false sense of security. Often the victim has a serious injury or is knocked unconscious and cannot swim.
    • Other factors that can affect swimming ability include cold water immersion, heavy clothes or alcohol consumption.
  • Know the water
    • Cold water can cause hyperventilation contributing to fatigue. When combined with swift water, even the strongest swimmers are easily overwhelmed.
    • Cold water can stimulate the "gasp reflex" causing involuntary inhalation of air or water.
    • Sudden cold water immersion can trigger cardiac arrest.
    • Cold water entering the ear canal can cause vertigo and disorientation. This may confuse the swimmer causing the victim to swim deeper into the water or into the propeller.
  • Know your limits
    • Swimming in open water is more difficult than in a swimming pool. People tire more quickly and can get into trouble.
    • Properly load your vessel.
    • Avoid alcohol consumption while boating. If you do consume alcohol, wear a life jacket.
    • Drinking alcohol can also accelerate the effects of hypothermia.

Boaters are also reminded of a new life jacket age requirement. Children under the age of 13 are now required to wear a life jacket when on a moving boat that's 26 feet in length or less.

For more information on boating safety, laws, or to order a boating safety course, please visit www.BoatSmarter.com or call (888) 326-2822. Remember, "If it's your boat, it's your responsibility."

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Reporting a Boating Accident in California
State law requires boaters involved in accidents to file a written report with DBW when a person dies, disappears or requires medical attention beyond first aid. A report is also required when an accident results in damage to a vessel or other property exceeding $500 or there is a complete loss of a vessel. Boaters can find a printable California Boating Accident Report form at www.dbw.ca.gov/PDF/AccidentForms/BAR.pdf.

About DBW
DBW promotes on-the-water safety and helps develop convenient public access to the waterways through programs funded by vessel registration fees, boating fuel tax dollars and boating facility construction loan payments.



04/21/2010

SPRING SNOWMELT PROMPTS WATER SAFETY WARNING
Outdoor Recreationists Should Take Precautions Against Cold Temperatures, Swift Currents When in or Near Water

Contact:  PG&E Media Relations (415) 973-8709
California Department of Boating and Waterways (916) 651-5692

April 21, 2010



SACRAMENTO, Calif. – The spring snowmelt has prompted a warning from Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and the California Department of Boating and Waterways (DBW) urging outdoor recreationists to take precautions against cold and swift currents before entering the water.

The utility and state agency cautioned that snowpacks are slightly above normal for this time of year. As warmer weather and longer days begins to melt snow in mountainous regions of the state, water temperatures will continue to drop and flows will continue to rise in waterways and reservoirs.

Those planning outings near mountain streams, rivers, reservoirs and canals need to be extra vigilant and take appropriate safety measures,” said Alvin Thoma, director of PG&E’s power generation department. “Water flows will fluctuate with the warming and cooling of the day so always be prepared for a change in conditions.” 

“Snowmelt and resulting swift and cold river flows can create treacherous conditions for all recreationists – waders, swimmers, paddlers, boaters, anglers and even hikers cooling off at the water’s edge,” said DBW’s Interim Director Lucia C. Becerra. “Stay safe by wearing a life jacket, avoiding alcohol and being aware of the current.”

Lakes and ponds are very attractive on warm spring days but are also cold. Rafters, kayakers, and canoeists should beware of fast river flows and cold water, and should exercise extreme caution by checking local conditions before undertaking their trip. Parents should also exercise caution with young children playing in or near the water.

Here are some safety tips:

Know the Water

  • Sudden immersion in ice-cold water can stimulate the “gasp reflex” causing an involuntary inhalation of air or water. It can even trigger cardiac arrest, temporary paralysis, hypothermia and drowning. When combined with swift water, even the strongest swimmers may be easily overwhelmed.
  • Cold water entering the ear canal can cause vertigo and disorientation. This may confuse swimmers, causing them to venture deeper into the water.

Know your limits

  • Swimming in open water is more difficult than in a swimming pool – people tire more quickly and can get into trouble.
  • Cold water causes impairment leading to fatalities. It reduces body heat 25-30 times faster than air does at the same temperature.
  • Many unseen obstacles can be lurking below the waters surface. Swift water can make these obstacles even more treacherous.

Wear a life jacket

  • Conditions change quickly in open water and even the best swimmers can misjudge the water and their skills when boating or swimming.  Wearing a life jacket can increase survival time.
  • A life jacket can provide some thermal protection against the onset of hypothermia and keep you stay afloat until someone else can rescue you.

Know the Law

  • A new boating law states that children under age 13 must wear a life jacket when on a vessel that is 26 feet or less in length.
  • Every person on board a personal watercraft (popularly known as “jet skis”) and any person being towed behind a vessel must wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket.
  • No person should ever operate any vessel or water ski or under the influence of drugs or with an alcohol level of .08 percent or more. 

About DBW
DBW enhances public access to California’s waterways and promotes on-the-water safety through programs funded by vessel registration fees, boating fuel tax dollars and boating facility construction loan payments. For more information, visit www.dbw.ca.gov.

About PG&E

Pacific Gas and Electric Company, a subsidiary of PG&E Corporation (NYSE:PCG), is one of the largest combined natural gas and electric utilities in the United States. Based in San Francisco, with 20,000 employees, the company delivers some of the nation’s cleanest energy to 15 million people in Northern and Central California. For more information, visit www.pge.com/about/.



01/17/2010

WEATHER ADVISORY: Coast Guard urges caution with strong storms forecasted


Contact:  Lt.j.g Jeremy Pichette (415) 399-3492

January 17, 2010


SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Coast Guard along with the California Department of Boating and Waterway is urging water enthusiasts and vessel owners to take appropriate safety precautions due to incoming storm systems.

Beginning today and spanning through Saturday, the California coast will experience significant rainfall accompanied with high winds and surf. Tuesday through Wednesday, a west to northwest swell will develop with seas reaching 25-feet. The National Weather Service has issued a high wind watch for Monday. Southeast winds are expected to pickup Monday, increasing to 20 to 45 miles per hour.

The Coast Guard encourages all boaters to check the status of mooring and anchor lines, and replace worn lines if necessary. Vessel owners should also double-up existing mooring lines. During strong winds and heavy seas, vessels can come loose from the pier or anchor due to worn lines.

Vessels adrift can become hazardous to nearby vessels as they are tossed about and can become hazards to navigation. These vessels can also pose environmental risk as any fluids or chemicals onboard can spill or leak should the vessel break apart.

The Coast Guard strongly recommends that people avoid going near beaches or other low-lying coastal areas, especially jetties and rocky areas, over the next several days. Large waves can quickly, and unexpectedly sweep a person from these areas. Even the strongest swimmers can quickly be overtaken by the power of the sea, especially when the cold-water temperatures are factored in.

The Coast Guard also strongly recommends boaters avoid taking to the water over the next few days, until the seas subside.

If it necessary to get underway, mariners are urged to check that all of their safety equipment is in good condition.

There should be a personal flotation device onboard for each person, sized accordingly. If boaters will be traveling offshore, it is strongly recommended that there be an immersion suit or other full-body protection, as water temperatures will be cold, and hypothermia can quickly overtake the average person.

All boaters should also ensure that they have a working marine VHF radio on board to contact the Coast Guard on channel 16 should an emergency arise. The Coast Guard reminds all mariners that channel 16 is an emergency frequency, and should be used for such. Misuse of channel 16 or broadcasting false distress calls can result in prison time, severe fines, and you could be liable for any costs incurred as a result of search efforts.

The Coast Guard also strongly recommends that all boaters file a float plan with a friend or family member on land, with an approximate time of return and location to which you will be heading. It is also recommended that you regularly check in with those who are aware of your plan, especially if your plan should change.

Mariners should check current and forecasted weather conditions prior to getting underway, and remain aware of changing conditions once on the water. The National Weather Service broadcasts weather conditions throughout the day on VHF channel WX2. The Coast Guard broadcasts weather conditions on VHF channel 22A at 9:30 a.m., noon, and 4:30 p.m.

For more information on boating safety and required and recommended safety equipment, please visit www.uscgboating.org.

For more information on weather conditions, please visit www.weather.gov.



01/12/2010

WEATHER ADVISORY: Coast Guard, National Weather Service urge caution with high surf forecasted


Contact:  Lt.j.g Jeremy Pichette (415) 399-3492

Petty Officer Pam Manns (510) 772-8865

January 12, 2010


 

SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Coast Guard is urging mariners and water enthusiast to exercise caution Tuesday through Thursday as the National Weather Service has issued a high surf warning from Point Reyes National Seashore south through the Big Sur coastline.

"Large waves approaching California will produce high surf at area beaches" said National Weather Service Meteorologist Tom Evans. "Waves over 20 feet will create dangerous surf conditions and very strong rip currents. Avoid the coast and do not enter the water during high surf conditions. Series of larger waves can surprise even the most experienced mariner and beachgoer causing disorientation or serious injury."

The Coast Guard has witnessed a recent increase to surfer related rescues within the Bay Area over the last several weeks. All water enthusiast are urged to exercise extreme caution and avoid taking to the water if at all possible.

The Coast Guard also strongly recommends boaters avoid taking to the water over the next few days or until the seas subside.

If it is necessary to get underway, mariners are urged to check all of their safety equipment to ensure it is in good condition and in proper working order.

All boats are required to have personal flotation devices onboard for each person, sized accordingly. If boaters will be traveling offshore, it is strongly recommended that there be an immersion suit or other full-body protection, as water temperatures will be cold, and hypothermia can quickly overtake the average person.

All boaters should also ensure that they have a working marine VHF radio on board to contact the Coast Guard on channel 16 should an emergency arise. The Coast Guard reminds all mariners that channel 16 is an emergency frequency, and should be used for such. Misuse of channel 16 or broadcasting false distress calls can result in prison time, severe fines, and persons could be liable for any costs incurred as a result of search efforts.

The Coast Guard also strongly recommends that all boaters file a float plan with a friend or family member on land, with an approximate time of return and a planned route of travel. It is recommended that mariners regularly check in with those who are aware of the float plan, especially if the float plan changes.

Mariners should check current and forecasted weather conditions prior to getting underway, and remain aware of changing conditions once on the water. The National Weather Service broadcasts weather conditions throughout the day on VHF channel WX2. The Coast Guard broadcasts weather conditions on VHF channel 22A at 9:30 a.m., noon, and 4:30 p.m.

The Coast Guard also encourages all boaters to check the status of mooring and anchor lines, and replace worn lines if necessary. During strong winds and heavy seas, vessels can come loose from the pier or anchor due to worn lines, not having enough lines attached to the pier or having a heavy enough anchor.

Vessels adrift can become hazardous to nearby vessels as they are tossed about, and can become hazards to navigation once the storm has passed. These vessels can also pose environmental risk as any fluids or chemicals onboard can spill or leak should the vessel break apart.

For more information on boating safety and required and recommended safety equipment, please visit www.uscgboating.org.

For more information on weather conditions, please visit www.weather.gov.