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Press: 2013 News Releases

12/06/2013


DBW Begins Controlling Water Hyacinth with Mechanical Harvesting





December 6, 2013

Contact: Gloria Sandoval
916.651.5692

DBW Begins Controlling Water Hyacinth with Mechanical Harvesting

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Yesterday, California State Parks Division of Boating and Waterways (DBW) began mechanical harvesting of water hyacinth in parts of the Delta. Harvesting will continue until the beginning of next year’s herbicide treatment season (early March).

The focus of the mechanical harvesting will be at various locations including Stockton’s Marina and Waterfront, Village West Marina, Fourteen Mile Slough, Rivers End Marina, Old River, Whiskey Slough, Weatherbee Lake, as well as various adjacent areas where water hyacinth has travelled and is impairing navigation.

DBW recognizes the challenges it has with water hyacinth, and its impact to the public. In an effort to continue providing an essential public service, new treatment methods and chemicals are continually being considered. Mechanical harvesting is an alternative tactic for DBW that is in compliance with federal permits to deal with this invasive aquatic plant. Site selection for this new removal method for this year was made after the completion the herbicidal treatment season (November 30) by DBW crews who physically surveyed sites for areas most impacted by the invasive plant, and of which navigation was impaired or completely blocked.

The division operates a control program, not an eradication program. Eradication of water hyacinth from the Delta is impossible. Seed production from water hyacinth has established a high seed bank in the sediment. Seeds will continue to germinate even if all surface plants have been removed from the water. Seeds cannot be removed easily and have been reported to survive up to 15-20 years in dried mud.

For more information on DBW’s Water Hyacinth Control Program, visit www.dbw.parks.ca.gov.

Our Mission
To provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state's extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation.



08/28/2013

Outdoor Recreation Tips for a Safe Labor Day Weekend


Contact:  Gloria Sandoval (916) 651-5692

August 28, 2013


SACRAMENTO, Calif. - California State Parks invites outdoor enthusiasts to enjoy this Labor Day weekend safely. Labor Day weekend draws a high number of visitors to California state parks. Also, California’s boating accident statistics show that most fatalities on California’s waterways occur during busy summer holiday periods, such as Labor Day weekend.

So whether you are walking/hiking a trail, operating an off-highway vehicle, viewing historical sites, relaxing on a beach or exploring California’s waterways in a boat, please do so safely. Below are some simple tips to keep you, and your family and friends safe during the upcoming holiday.

  1. Weather
    • Check the weather before you leave.
    • Make sure your equipment is appropriate for the weather expected. Always pack cold weather gear in the event the weather changes, even in summer.
    • Take precautions against the heat by staying hydrated and avoiding prolonged exposure to the sun.
  2. Fires
    • Please contain your fires to a manageable size within the appropriate metal rings and fire pits provided by Parks.
    • The use of fireworks is not allowed.
    • Ensure all campfires are completely extinguished before leaving.
  3. Boating and Water Safety
    • Beach users should stay in designated swim areas and be alert for rip currents and sneaker waves.
    • Children should always be actively supervised by an adult when in or near the water. Designate a water watcher. Do not assume that an adult is supervising children.
    • Be sure to use properly fitted life jackets, especially with children and on cold or fast inland waters where lifeguards are not stationed.
    • Never swim alone.
    • Know the rules of the waterways to avoid a boating accident or fatality.
  4. Off-Highway Vehicles
    • Wear safety gear suitable to the vehicle you are driving.
    • In the summer, temperatures can reach upwards of 125 degrees at many Off-Highway Vehicle Areas. Use caution and keep hydrated.
    • Check the road conditions before you go. Never hike or ride alone. Tell someone your plans.
    • Drive with courtesy. Be prepared to yield to right of way anytime there is doubt and you can safely do so.
  5. Trails
    • Bring a basic first aid kit, wear proper shoes fit for hiking, a hat for sun protection, and bring drinking water.
    • Please observe trail signage, if you are an equestrian or mountain biker, only ride on designated trails.
    • Keep bicycles, horses and other animals in control and on the trails.
    • Be courteous of other trail users, practice trail etiquette and stay alert.

Lastly, outdoor enthusiasts are reminded that alcohol is banned in public areas of some parks. So please check local rules. If you do drink alcohol, please remember that there are many dangers associated with the consumption of this beverage. The side effects of alcohol – impaired judgment, reduced balanced, poor coordination, etc. – can be magnified by the outdoor environment. Therefore, your ability to operate recreational vehicles and/or vessels, or the ability to rescue yourself or others in the water can be hindered.

Connect with California State Park’s through its website, Facebook or Twitter to view more information on how to keep your family and friends safe when recreating outdoors. You can also visit the department’s website to book a camping reservation. It is not too late to make reservations for camping to celebrate Labor Day. Reservations are taken up to two days in advance of arrival. For more details or to view available parks, click here.



07/11/2013



Coast Guard safety zone for America’s Cup races in San Francisco Bay


Contact:  Chief Petty Officer Mike Lutz
San Francisco Sector
(415) 399-7317

July 2, 2013


SAN FRANCISCO — The Coast Guard will establish a safety zone in San Francisco Bay for the Louis Vuitton Cup and the America’s Cup Finals from July 7 to Sept. 21.

The safety zone extends from Crissy Field to Pier 23 and will be in effect from approximately 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. each race day.

The interior of the regulated area will contain a race area marked by stake boats that will fly large red America’s Cup flags. Vessels that have systems that can pick up the Automatic Identification Systems signal will see the race area outlined with virtual buoys. Vessels may enter the regulated area but may not enter the race area defined by the stake boats.

Entry into or through the race area is strictly prohibited without receiving permission from the Patrol Commander via VHF-channel 23. Unauthorized entry may result in civil and, or criminal penalties.

People who plan to watch the America’s Cup races from the water are reminded to wear proper fitting life jackets.  In 2011, 84 percent of all fatal boating accident victims were not wearing a proper life jacket.  Alcohol is the leading contributing factor in fatal boating accidents. Operating a vessel with a blood alcohol content of .08 or higher is illegal in California.  Vessel operators should check that all safety gear is aboard their vessel before departing the pier and ensure they have a sober boat driver.

In the event of an emergency the Coast Guard Sector San Francisco Command Center can be reached on VHF-channel 16 or at 415-399-3547.

The regulated area for the 2013 America's Cup races in San Francisco July 7 to Sept. 21. This area extends from Crissy Field to Aquatic Park. (U.S. Coast Guard graphic)

The race area is within the green shaded area, except for the finish line that will be near Pier 27. Vessels may not enter the race area that will be outlined by stake boats.  Recommended waterside spectator viewing areas are shown as blue ovals on this chart.

More information:

Local Notice to Mariners

Broadcast to Mariners on VHF channel 22A

Media interested in covering Coast Guard operations or related stories during the America’s Cup races should contact Chief Petty Officer Mike Lutz at 415-399-7317, or at Michael.Lutz@uscg.mil, at least 24 hours prior to their requests deadline.

###

Saving Lives and Guarding the Coast Since 1790.
The United States Coast Guard -- Proud History. Powerful Future.


07/01/2013

Boating and Waterways Merges as a Division Under Department of Parks and Recreation


06/28/2013


Avoid a Boating Accident this Fourth of July


Contact:  Gloria Sandoval (916) 651-5692

June 28, 2013


SACRAMENTO, Calif. - The California Department of Boating and Waterways (DBW) reminds boaters to use caution on the water this Fourth of July. DBW’s boating accident data shows that more boating accidents occur during this holiday than any other. Waterways are crowded and people boat in groups or with many people aboard their vessels. Distractions are numerous.

“Operator inattention is the number one cause of boating accidents,” said DBW’s Acting Director Colonel Christopher C. Conlin, USMC (Ret). “Designating another person on board to act as an additional lookout for other boats, obstacles, or people in the water, can give the operator more reaction time to avoid an accident.”

The following are other tips that can greatly decrease the chances of a boater being involved in a boating accident:

  • Avoid alcohol. Everyone who drinks alcohol on board--not just the operator--is at risk.  Intoxicated passengers can easily fall overboard, swim near the propeller, or cause the vessel to capsize.
  • Wear a life jacket. There must be a properly-fitted life jacket on the vessel for each person. Children under the age of 13, all personal watercraft riders, paddle-boarders, and anyone being towed behind a boat are required by law to wear a lifejacket.
  • Know some basic rules of the road.  Steer to the right when approaching another vessel head on, and remember that in a crossing situation involving two power-driven boats, the boater on the right has the right-of-way.
  • Operate your boat at a reasonable speed. Boats do not have brakes. Operators need to allow for adequate stopping distances to avoid accidents.
  • Properly use water ski flags when skiers, wakeboarders or tubers are down. Improper use of flags can be dangerous not only to the person in the water, but to passing boats as well. A ski line entangled in the propeller of a passing boat can result in a deadly accident.

For more safety tips or to view California’s boating laws, please visit www.BoatResponsibly.com. Remember, “If it’s your boat, it’s your responsibility”.

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Reporting a Boating Accident in California
State law requires boaters involved in accidents to file a written report with DBW when a person dies, disappears or requires medical attention beyond first aid. A report is also required when an accident results in damage to a vessel or other property exceeding $500 or there is a complete loss of a vessel. Boating Accident Report Form.

About DBW
DBW promotes on-the-water safety and helps develop convenient public access to the waterways through programs funded by vessel registration fees, boating fuel tax dollars and boating facility construction loan payments.

Effective July 1, 2013, the Department of Boating and Waterways will become a Division under the Department of Parks and Recreation. The merger is part of Governor Brown's Reorganization Plan to consolidate and simplify the State's organizational structure.



Click here for more information.


06/25/2013


Operation Dry Water Targets Drinking And Boating Dangers June 28 - 30


Contact:  Gloria Sandoval (916) 651-5692

June 25, 2013


SACRAMENTO, Calif. - California law enforcement officers will be out in force on the state’s waterways during the weekend of June 28 through 30 for Operation Dry Water.

Operation Dry Water is an annual nationwide effort to highlight the risks and dangers of operating boats under the influence. The stepped up enforcement raises awareness of operating boats under the influence of alcohol or drugs in advance of the Fourth of July holiday. Falling on a Thursday, this year’s Independence Day will kick off a four-day weekend for thousands of California boaters seeking quality time with friends and family.

One quick way to end the fun is drinking alcohol, not only for those operating boats, but for everyone aboard. Out of 53 boating fatalities during 2012, 35 percent were alcohol related.

“Mixing drinking and boating drastically increases the odds for a painful or even tragic outcome, not to mention the humiliation and expense of getting arrested,” said Department of Boating and Waterways Acting Director Colonel Christopher C. Conlin, USMC (Ret). “We’re also calling attention to the dangers of passengers becoming intoxicated, because drunken passengers can easily fall overboard, swim near propellers, or in small vessels, cause capsizes by leaning or standing up.”

Alcohol can impair a boater’s judgment, balance, vision and reaction time. It can increase fatigue and susceptibility to the effect of cold-water immersion. Sun, wind, noise, vibration and motion – “stressors” common to the boating environment – intensify the side effects of alcohol, drugs and some prescription medications.

In California, it is against the law to operate a boat or water ski with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 percent or more. A person with a BAC less than 0.08 percent may also be arrested if conditions are deemed to be unsafe. If convicted, a person may be sentenced to jail for up to six months and assessed fines of up to $1,000. Two convictions within seven years could add a jail term of up to one year. Boaters caught operating under the influence may also find their voyage terminated and their vessel impounded.

For more information on this annual event, visit http://www.OperationDryWater.org. California specific boating laws and safety tips may be found at www.BoatSmarter.com.


06/12/2013


Free Seminar Provides San Francisco Bay/Delta Marina and Yacht Club Operators Oil Spill Emergency Resource Information


Contact:  Gloria Sandoval (916) 651-5692

June 12, 2013


SACRAMENTO, Calif. - San Francisco Bay/Delta marinas and yacht clubs are invited to a free seminar that presents oil spill response resource information.  The free seminar will take place July 11 from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. in Oakland. Space is limited. Registration by July 5 is required.

As waterfront stakeholders, marina and yacht club operators possess extensive local waterway and boating knowledge. The seminar will cover information on:

  • California’s oil spill response structure
  • Office of Spill Prevention and Response Equipment Grants
  • Third party claim process
  • General information on oil spill kits for boating facilities
  • California’s new Marinas and Yacht Clubs Spill Response Communication Packet
  • Tools and resources available to increase communication capabilities between boating facilities and the Office of Emergency Services during an oil spill

Key presenters include: California Department of Boating and Waterways, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, California Emergency Management Agency and California Coastal Commission’s Boating Clean and Green Program.

To register, please contact California’s Boating Clean and Green Program Coordinator, Vivian Matuk, via e-mail or at (415) 904-6905.  Information on the location of the seminar, lunch and parking options will be provided once registration has been processed.

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The Boating Clean and Green Program is an education and outreach program conducted through the California Department of Boating and Waterways and California Coastal Commission. The program promotes environmentally-sound boating practices to marine business and boaters.



05/23/2013


SPRING SNOWMELT PROMPTS WATER SAFETY WARNING

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), the California Department of Boating and Waterways (DBW), and California State Parks Warn Outdoor Recreationists to Take Precautions this Season

Contact: PG&E External Communications, (415) 973-8709
Contact: Boating and Waterways, (916) 651-5692

May 22, 2013


SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Water enthusiasts should take serious precautions against cold temperatures and swift currents when in or near water this spring. Despite this year’s below-normal snowfall, the spring snowmelt can still result in swift and cold river flows that can create treacherous conditions for all recreationists – waders, swimmers, paddlers, boaters, anglers, and even hikers cooling off at the water’s edge.

The utility and state departments cautioned that even though the water content of California’s mountain snowpack is below normal, there is still a significant amount of water in the snowpack and it is rapidly melting as mid-spring temperatures continue to warm. As warmer weather and longer days accelerate melting snow in mountainous regions, water temperatures will continue to drop and flows will continue to rise in waterways and reservoirs, with some reservoirs spilling and resulting in higher flows downstream.

“Those planning outings near mountain streams, rivers and reservoirs need to be vigilant and take appropriate safety measures,” said Randy Livingston, PG&E’s vice president of power generation. “Water flows will fluctuate with the warming and cooling of the day so outdoor recreationists should always be prepared for a change in conditions.”

“Even experienced swimmers can get caught in swift river flows, debris or suffer from hypothermia,” said DBW’s Acting Director Colonel Christopher C. Conlin, USMC (Ret). “Stay safe by checking local water conditions , avoiding alcohol and most importantly wearing life jackets. These tips can make a difference between life and death situations.”

“Spring is a wonderful time to visit our beautiful lakes and fast-moving rivers,” said California State Parks Director Major General Anthony L. Jackson, USMC (Ret.). “But please read the safety tips in this water safety warning because making a mistake could threaten the life of a loved one.”

Water safety tips:

Know the Water

  • Sudden immersion in cold water can stimulate the “gasp reflex,” causing an involuntary inhalation of air or water. It can even trigger cardiac arrest, temporary paralysis, hypothermia and drowning. When faced with swift water, even the strongest swimmers may be easily overwhelmed.
  • Cold water entering the ear canal can cause vertigo and disorientation. This may confuse swimmers, causing them to venture deeper into the water.
Know your Limits
  • Swimming in open water is more difficult than in a swimming pool – people tire more quickly and can get into trouble.
  • Cold water causes impairment leading to fatalities. It reduces body heat 25 to 30 times faster than air does at the same temperature.
  • Many unseen obstacles can be lurking below the water’s surface. Swift water can make these obstacles even more treacherous. Guided trips for inexperienced paddlers are recommended.
Wear a Life Jacket
  • Conditions change quickly in open water and even the best swimmers can misjudge the water and their skills when boating or swimming. Wearing a life jacket can increase survival time.
  • A life jacket can provide some thermal protection against the onset of hypothermia and keep you afloat until someone else can rescue you.
Parental Supervision
  • Actively supervise children in and around open bodies of water, giving them your undivided attention. Appoint a designated “water watcher,” taking turns with other adults.
  • Teach children that swimming in open water is not the same as swimming in a pool: they need to be aware of uneven surfaces, river currents, ocean undertow and changing weather.
Know the Law
  • Every child under 13 must wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket when on a moving vessel that is 26 feet or less in length.
  • A Coast Guard-approved life jacket must be carried for each person on board a boat. This includes rigid or inflatable paddlecraft.
  • Every person on board a personal watercraft (popularly known as “jet skis”) and any person being towed behind a vessel must wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket.
  • It is against the law to operate a boat or water ski with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 percent or more. You can be arrested even when your BAC is less than 0.08 percent if conditions are deemed to be unsafe.

About DBW

DBW enhances public access to California’s waterways and promotes on-the-water safety to California’s more than four million motorized and non-motorized boaters through programs funded by vessel registration fees, boating fuel tax dollars and boating facility construction loan payments. For more information, visit www.dbw.ca.gov.

About PG&E

Pacific Gas and Electric Company, a subsidiary of PG&E Corporation (NYSE:PCG), is one of the largest combined natural gas and electric utilities in the United States. Based in San Francisco, with 20,000 employees, the company delivers some of the nation’s cleanest energy to 15 million people in Northern and Central California. For more information, visit www.pge.com/about/.

About California State Parks

California State Parks manages 278 parks units in a system that contains 1.5 million acres, 300 miles of the California coastline, 640 miles of lakefront and more than 300 miles of rivers. More than 65-million people visited State Parks in 2010. For more information, visit www.parks.ca.gov.

NOTE TO MEDIA: Story opportunities on water safety can be scheduled with DBW.


05/22/2013


SPRING SNOWMELT PROMPTS WATER SAFETY WARNING

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), the California Department of Boating and Waterways (DBW), and California State Parks Warn Outdoor Recreationists to Take Precautions this Season

Contact: PG&E External Communications, (415) 973-8709
Contact: Boating and Waterways, (916) 651-5692

May 22, 2013


SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Water enthusiasts should take serious precautions against cold temperatures and swift currents when in or near water this spring. Despite this year’s below-normal snowfall, the spring snowmelt can still result in swift and cold river flows that can create treacherous conditions for all recreationists – waders, swimmers, paddlers, boaters, anglers, and even hikers cooling off at the water’s edge.

The utility and state departments cautioned that even though the water content of California’s mountain snowpack is below normal, there is still a significant amount of water in the snowpack and it is rapidly melting as mid-spring temperatures continue to warm. As warmer weather and longer days accelerate melting snow in mountainous regions, water temperatures will continue to drop and flows will continue to rise in waterways and reservoirs, with some reservoirs spilling and resulting in higher flows downstream.

“Those planning outings near mountain streams, rivers and reservoirs need to be vigilant and take appropriate safety measures,” said Randy Livingston, PG&E’s vice president of power generation. “Water flows will fluctuate with the warming and cooling of the day so outdoor recreationists should always be prepared for a change in conditions.”

“Even experienced swimmers can get caught in swift river flows, debris or suffer from hypothermia,” said DBW’s Acting Director Colonel Christopher C. Conlin, USMC (Ret). “Stay safe by checking local water conditions , avoiding alcohol and most importantly wearing life jackets. These tips can make a difference between life and death situations.”

“Spring is a wonderful time to visit our beautiful lakes and fast-moving rivers,” said California State Parks Director Major General Anthony L. Jackson, USMC (Ret.). “But please read the safety tips in this water safety warning because making a mistake could threaten the life of a loved one.”

Water safety tips:

Know the Water

  • Sudden immersion in cold water can stimulate the “gasp reflex,” causing an involuntary inhalation of air or water. It can even trigger cardiac arrest, temporary paralysis, hypothermia and drowning. When faced with swift water, even the strongest swimmers may be easily overwhelmed.
  • Cold water entering the ear canal can cause vertigo and disorientation. This may confuse swimmers, causing them to venture deeper into the water.
Know your Limits
  • Swimming in open water is more difficult than in a swimming pool – people tire more quickly and can get into trouble.
  • Cold water causes impairment leading to fatalities. It reduces body heat 25 to 30 times faster than air does at the same temperature.
  • Many unseen obstacles can be lurking below the water’s surface. Swift water can make these obstacles even more treacherous. Guided trips for inexperienced paddlers are recommended.
Wear a Life Jacket
  • Conditions change quickly in open water and even the best swimmers can misjudge the water and their skills when boating or swimming. Wearing a life jacket can increase survival time.
  • A life jacket can provide some thermal protection against the onset of hypothermia and keep you afloat until someone else can rescue you.
Parental Supervision
  • Actively supervise children in and around open bodies of water, giving them your undivided attention. Appoint a designated “water watcher,” taking turns with other adults.
  • Teach children that swimming in open water is not the same as swimming in a pool: they need to be aware of uneven surfaces, river currents, ocean undertow and changing weather.
Know the Law
  • Every child under 13 must wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket when on a moving vessel that is 26 feet or less in length.
  • A Coast Guard-approved life jacket must be carried for each person on board a boat. This includes rigid or inflatable paddlecraft.
  • Every person on board a personal watercraft (popularly known as “jet skis”) and any person being towed behind a vessel must wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket.
  • It is against the law to operate a boat or water ski with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 percent or more. You can be arrested even when your BAC is less than 0.08 percent if conditions are deemed to be unsafe.

About DBW

DBW enhances public access to California’s waterways and promotes on-the-water safety to California’s more than four million motorized and non-motorized boaters through programs funded by vessel registration fees, boating fuel tax dollars and boating facility construction loan payments. For more information, visit www.dbw.ca.gov.

About PG&E

Pacific Gas and Electric Company, a subsidiary of PG&E Corporation (NYSE:PCG), is one of the largest combined natural gas and electric utilities in the United States. Based in San Francisco, with 20,000 employees, the company delivers some of the nation’s cleanest energy to 15 million people in Northern and Central California. For more information, visit www.pge.com/about/.

About California State Parks

California State Parks manages 278 parks units in a system that contains 1.5 million acres, 300 miles of the California coastline, 640 miles of lakefront and more than 300 miles of rivers. More than 65-million people visited State Parks in 2010. For more information, visit www.parks.ca.gov.

NOTE TO MEDIA: Story opportunities on water safety can be scheduled with DBW



05/21/2013

Life Jacket Trade-In Events to be Held May 24 and 25
Visit Select Locations to Participate


Contact:  Gloria Sandoval (916) 651-5692

May 21, 2013


SACRAMENTO, Calif. - The Department of Boating and Waterways (DBW) announces the 14th Annual Life Jacket Trade-In. Events will be held at 30 locations across the state on May 24 and 25.
 
Of the 53 boating fatalities reported to DBW last year, 33 drowned. All drowning victims were found without life jackets on. It is important for all water enthusiasts, no matter how young or old, to wear properly fitted Coast Guard-approved life jackets. Life jackets that are too small will not be able to keep bodies afloat. Life jackets that are too big can slip off or push up around the face area, which could be dangerous. 

The life jacket trade-in gives water enthusiasts the opportunity to have their life jackets inspected by professionals. If a life jacket is found to be outgrown or unserviceable, a new, properly fitted Coast Guard-approved life jacket will be given in exchange. (One life jacket per family, while supplies last.) Click here for event locations.

This year’s partners include Big Bear Municipal Water District, CBS Radio, Department of Parks and Recreation, Drowning Accident Rescue Team, Kohl’s Department Stores, Radio Disney, Sacramento Safe Kids Coalition, San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department, Solano County Sheriff’s Department, US Army Corps of Engineers, US Coast Guard Auxiliary, UC Davis Regents and US Power Squadrons.

This event is being conducted in connection with National Safe Boating Week (May 18-24), which aims to spread the message about life jacket wear and other life-saving boating practices.

California boating law requires all children under the age of 13, every person on board a personal watercraft (Jet Ski) or being towed behind a vessel to wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket.  The law also requires life jackets to be carried on a vessel for every person on board.

For more information about the life jacket trade-in or life jackets, please visit www.WearItCalifornia.com.

DBW enhances public access to California’s waterways and promotes boating and aquatic safety through programs funded by vessel registration fees, boating fuel tax dollars and boating facility construction loan payments.

Note to media: DBW supplies life jackets for children and adults to public and private life jacket loan stations across the state. The program gives an individual or family the opportunity to check out a life jacket for a day or a weekend by simply completing a loan form. For more information, visit www.WearItCalifornia.com.


05/17/2013

'WEAR YOUR LIFE JACKET TO WORK DAY' MAY 17
Safety Encouraged As Summer Boating Season Gets Underway


Contact:  Gloria Sandoval (916) 651-5692

May 17, 2013



SACRAMENTO, Calif. - This Casual Friday marked a fun way to show support for water safety by joining “Wear Your Life Jacket to Work Day.”

Throughout the nation today, people promoted water safety while sporting a totally different look at work by wearing their favorite life jacket in honor of “Wear Your Life Jacket to Work Day,” a National Safe Boating Week event promoted by the California Department of Boating and Waterways (DBW).

In an effort to increase boating safety this summer, especially during busy holiday weekends, DBW encourages boaters to equip fishing boats, kayaks and all recreational vessels with proper safety equipment. Most importantly, wearing a life jacket at all times while on the water is essential to avoiding a tragedy.

During 2012, DBW received reports for 473 boating accidents, 247 injuries and 53 fatalities on California waterways.  Of the 33 victims that drowned, none were wearing a life jacket. Statistics repeatedly show that the majority of boating accidents, injuries and fatalities occur during holiday weekends.  But by following state boating laws and common sense — avoiding alcohol consumption, checking weather and wave conditions — people can experience a waterway adventure safely and enjoyably.

Specifically, important safety tips for boaters include:

  • Wear your life jacket.  State law requires there be a properly-fitted life jacket on every recreational vessel for each person aboard.  Children under 13, all personal watercraft riders, and anybody being towed by a boat must wear a life jacket at all times. DBW recommends all persons wear their life jackets while on waterways for optimal safety.
  • Keep track of your location.  Boaters should familiarize themselves with local waters and pay attention to surroundings to minimize the chances of an emergency turning into a tragedy.
  • Follow boating laws.  The best way to ensure a safe and enjoyable time on California’s many waterways is to follow state boating laws.  These laws may be found in the ABCs of California Boating booklet or by taking a boating safety class.
  • Complete a vessel safety inspection.  Especially after the winter months, it is important to have your vessel inspected as a safety precaution. These inspections are complimentary and take only a couple of minutes. To book an appointment with a U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary examiner, boaters can visit: www.VesselSafetyCheck.org.

Additional safe boating information is available at www.WearItCalifornia.com. Boaters are also invited to use the department’s boating facility locator — a digital tool that makes enjoying California’s waterways easy. The locator can be downloaded to smartphones or viewed online at www.BoatFacilityLocator.com.

DBW promotes on-the-water safety and helps develop convenient public access to the waterways through programs funded by vessel registration fees, boating fuel tax dollars and boating facility construction loan payments.


04/19/2013

Free Seminars to Educate Boaters on Aquatic Invasive Species
Seminars being held in El Sobrante, Marina Del Rey and Sacramento


Contact:  Gloria Sandoval (916) 651-5692

April 19, 2013


SACRAMENTO, Calif. - California’s Boating Clean and Green Program is offering free seminars to teach the state’s recreational boating community about their role in combating aquatic invasive species.

Aquatic invasive species (AIS) like quagga and zebra mussels pose a serious threat to water delivery systems, hydroelectric facilities, agriculture, recreational boating and fishing and the ecosystem. Recreational vessels are one of the transporters of these species into uninfested waterways. Therefore, it is important for boaters, boating facility operators, and state and local agencies to learn how to inspect watercraft and fishing gear to prevent the spread of invasive species into California’s waterways.

Participants of the seminars will learn how to protect the quality of recreation and aquatic ecosystems; identify saltwater and freshwater AIS, including quagga and zebra mussels; understand their economic costs and operational impacts; and how watercraft and fishing gear inspections can reduce the spread of AIS.

Seminars will be held in El Sobrante, Marina Del Rey and Sacramento. Attached are the training dates and locations. Seminars are free and open to the public, but registration is required. To register, please contact the Boating Clean and Green Program Coordinator, Vivian Matuk, via e-mail or at (415) 904-6905. 

The Boating Clean and Green Program, which is conducted by the California Department of Boating and Waterways and the California Coastal Commission, is hosting these seminars in partnership with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the University of California ANR/Cooperative Extension and Sea Grant Extension Program.

 

The Boating Clean and Green Program is an education and outreach program conducted through the California Department of Boating and Waterways and California Coastal Commission. The program promotes environmentally-sound boating practices to marine business and boaters.



04/09/2013

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Awards more than $13 Million in Grants to Boost Recreational Boating in Communities Across Nation

City of Rio Vista, California to Receive $225,000

April 9, 2013
Kim Betton, 703-358-2081, Kim_Betton@fws.gov
Brent Lawrence, 703-358-2014, Brent_Lawrence@fws.gov


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today that the City of Rio Vista, Calif., will receive a $225,000 federal Boating Infrastucture Grant (BIG) to help fund a project to replace a deteriorating dock for recreational boaters. The California Department of Boating and Waterways will support efforts of the city to replace the dock, which will provide seven slips for eligible vessels. Federal grant funds will be matched with $75,000 in non-federal funding.

The grant to Rio Vista is among $11.2 million in competitive grants going to 15 states for projects to support recreational boating through the Boating Infrastructure Grant (BIG) program. The Fish and Wildlife Service will also release approximately $2.4 million to 25 states, commonwealths, and territories willing to match a smaller, non-competitive grant program known as “BIG Tier 1” funding.

Grantees use Boating Infrastructure Grant funds to construct, renovate, and maintain facilities with features for transient boats (those staying 10 days or less) that are 26 feet or more in length and used for recreation. Grantees may also use funds to produce and distribute information and educational materials about the program and recreational boating.

“These grants, funded by fishing and boating enthusiasts, have helped communities across the nation build and enhance recreational boating facilities that provide recreational opportunities while supporting jobs and economic growth,” said Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe. “This program is a win-win situation for recreational boaters, conservation initiatives and job creation.”

“The BIG Grants have major impacts – not only do cruising boaters get the benefit of facilities that they help to pay for, waterfront communities and their small businesses also get an economic boost from visitors who enjoy boating,” said Thom Dammrich, chairman of the Sport Fish and Boating Partnership Council and president of the National Marine Manufacturers’ Association.

For example, a BIG grant of nearly $1.5 million, matched with nearly $1 million in non-federal funding, will enable the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission to partner with the Bucks County Riverfront Program to install 25 new day slips on the Delaware River between Philadelphia and Trenton, New Jersey. The ADA-compliant project, part of a larger effort to improve the waterfront in Bristol Borough, will also include new educational signage, lighting, and breakwater structures to protect the facility.

And in Chattanooga, Tennessee, a grant of nearly $1.3 million, matched by nearly $3.9 million in non-federal funding from the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the City of Chattanooga, will go toward the construction or extension of guest dockage at four prominent locations along the south shore of the Tennessee River. Each location will include up to 10 slips, for a total of 40 new slips for eligible vessels.

Funding for the Boating Infrastructure Grant program comes from the Sport Fish Restoration and Boating Trust Fund, formerly known as the Aquatic Resources Trust Fund, which boaters and manufacturers support through excise and other taxes on certain fishing and boating equipment and gasoline. For more information on each of the grant projects, visit http://wsfrprograms.fws.gov/Subpages/GrantPrograms/BIG/BIG_Funding.html

The Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program (WSFR) is a 75-year partnership to benefit fish and wildlife, and provide Americans with access to the outdoors through a self-imposed investment paid by manufacturers and users of gear bought by anglers, boaters, hunters, and shooters and managed by Federal and State fish and wildlife agencies. Fishing and hunting licenses and motorboat fuel tax also support fish and wildlife. For 75 years, the Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program has provided more than $14 billion for fish and wildlife, supplied jobs for many Americans, and benefitted local economies through boating, fishing, hunting, and shooting activities.


The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws.gov/cno. Connect with our Facebook page, follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel, and download photos from our Flickr page.

-FWS-



04/08/2013

Coast Guard advises boaters and beachgoers to exercise caution


April 8, 2013


ALAMEDA, Calif. — The Coast Guard is urging mariners and beachgoers to exercise extreme caution when venturing out or near the water due to high winds and heavy seas impacting the northern and central coastline of California this evening and continuing into Tuesday evening.

A small craft advisory and a gale warning are in effect for much of the coast as the strong winds produce big waves and dangerous rip currents, endangering beachgoers and mariners and setting vessels adrift.

The heavy seas often produce dramatic beach scenes. Beachgoers need to remain vigilant and never turn their back to the ocean. Large waves, combined with strong rip currents, can knock adults off their feet and pull them out to sea. Beachgoers are reminded to avoid low-lying areas and to stay off the jetties.

Dog owners are also reminded to protect their pets from rough waves and not to attempt to rescue their dog from a surf zone. It is important to remember to keep calm and allow the dog to swim out on his or her own. Dogs tend to be stronger swimmers than people.

Additionally, it is recommended that individuals avoid taking to the water during this time. If it is necessary to get underway, mariners are urged to check all their safety equipment to ensure it is in good condition and working properly. This includes a properly fitted flotation device for everyone aboard, navigation lights, and distress signals. 

Boaters are strongly encouraged to have a VHF marine radio to monitor weather conditions and communicate with other mariners, emergency position indicator radio beacon and digital selective calling that allows the Coast Guard to know the position of vessel. For more information on boat safety visit http://www.uscgboating.org.

The Coast Guard is encouraging all vessel owners and operators to check the status of mooring and anchoring arrangements. Vessels that are not properly secured during a storm can break free from moorings, often a result of worn lines, an insufficient number of lines, or an improperly sized anchor or anchor chain. It is a good idea to double up vessel mooring lines during strong winds and heavy seas. Vessels that become adrift pose severe hazards to nearby people and vessels, and can also pose environmental risks as any fluids or chemicals onboard can spill or leak.

Most importantly, if there are any signs of distress, never hesitate to contact emergency crews for help. Dial 911 at the first signs of distress, and the Coast Guard is always standing by on marine channel 16.

For latest updates on the weather click the following links:

http://www.uscg.mil/news/stormcenter/

http://alerts.weather.gov/cap/ca.php?x=1



04/05/2013


Call for Proposals
Boating Infrastructure Grants Available for Marina Operators


Contact:  Gloria Sandoval (916) 651-5692

April 5, 2013


SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Marina operators can now apply for a National Boating Infrastructure Grant (BIG) for transient boat dock improvements through the Department of Boating and Waterways (DBW).

The deadline to submit grant proposal applications for Tier I and Tier II projects is Tues., Apr. 30, 2013.

BIG is a national competitive program open to both publicly- and privately-owned marinas with funding totaling $13 million. Eligible projects include installation or upgrades of visitor tie-up facilities for recreational boats 26-feet-long or longer, and renovation or construction of visitor docks, restrooms, gangways and dockside utility hookups. The funds are also used to produce and distribute information and educational materials about the program and recreational boating.

Applicants should first review the federal guidelines, to determine if they meet the necessary requirements. Eligibility criteria and submission information can be obtained by visiting www.dbw.ca.gov/Funding/BIG.aspx or contacting Kevin Atkinson at
(916) 327-1788. 

DBW is the designated agency responsible for administering U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (USFWS) BIG program in California. USFWS receives the applications from DBW and scores and ranks the proposals using a government/industry review committee.


The Department of Boating and Waterways enhances public access to California’s waterways and promotes on-the-water safety through programs funded by vessel registration fees, boating fuel tax dollars and boating facility construction loan payments.


03/28/2013

EPA Finalizes Vessel General Permit
Action will help protect U.S. water quality and reduce risk of invasive species


Contact:  Stacy Kika
kika.stacy@epa.gov
202-564-0906
202-564-4355

March 28, 2013

WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today issued a final vessel general permit regulating discharges from commercial vessels, including ballast water, to protect the nation’s waters from ship-borne pollutants and reduce invasive species in U.S. waters.

The final vessel general permit covers commercial vessels greater than 79 feet in length, excluding military and recreational vessels, and will replace the 2008 vessel general permit due to expire on Dec. 19, 2013.

This permit regulates 27 specific discharge categories, and will also provide improvements to the efficiency of the permit process, and clarify discharge requirements by the following:

- Reduce the risks of introduction of invasive species. The permit includes a more stringent numeric discharge standard limiting the release of non-indigenous invasive species in ballast water. The permit also contains additional environmental protection for the Great Lakes, which have suffered disproportionate impacts from invasive species, aligning federal standards with many Great Lakes states by requiring certain vessels to take additional precautions to reduce the risk of introducing new invasive species to U.S. waters.

- Reduce administrative burden for vessel owners and operators. The permit will eliminate duplicative reporting requirements, expand electronic recordkeeping opportunities, and reduce self-inspection frequency for vessels that are out of service for extended periods.

The new discharge standards are supported by independent studies by EPA’s science advisory board and the National Research Council, and are consistent with those contained in the International Maritime Organization’s 2004 Ballast Water Convention. EPA is issuing the permit in advance of the current permit's expiration to provide the regulated community time and flexibility to come into compliance with the new requirements.

More information: http://www.epa.gov/npdes/vessels



03/20/2013

$3.7 Million in Funding for Boating Facilities Approved
Projects Will Improve Facilities in Los Angeles, Mendocino, and Santa Barbara Counties


Contact:  Gloria Sandoval (916) 651-5692

March 20, 2013


SACRAMENTO, Calif. - The California Boating and Waterways Commission (Commission) today approved $3.7 million in funding to boating facilities in Los Angeles, Mendocino, and Santa Barbara Counties.

The projects and their improvements include:

County of Los Angeles
Frank G. Bonelli Regional Park Sailboat Cove Boat Launching Facility
The Commission approved a $400,000 grant to the County of Los Angeles for improvements to the Frank G. Bonelli Regional Park Sailboat Cove Boat Launching Facility. Planned improvements include: demolition of the two existing boarding floats; construction of one new boarding float; and creation of an accessible path of travel from the accessible parking spaces to the launch ramp.

United States Army Corp of Engineers
Lake Mendocino South Bay Boat Launching Facility (Mendocino County) The Commission approved a $1.4 million grant to the United States Army Corp of Engineers for improvements to the Lake Mendocino South Bay Boat Launching Facility. Planned improvements include the construction of a new parking area and addition of 63 parking spaces.

City of Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara Harbor – Marina One (Santa Barbara County)
The Commission approved a $1.9 million loan to the City of Santa Barbara for improvements to Marina One of the Santa Barbara Harbor. Planned improvements include the replacement of Fingers J and K (Phase 5) and the engineering phase of the replacement of Fingers A through K (Phase 5-8) of Marina One. These are a portion of the City of Santa Barbara’s Marina One Replacement Project; an eight phase, nine-year, full rehabilitation project of the Marina One headwalk and Fingers A through P.


—30—

Grant and loan applications are submitted to the Department of Boating and Waterways and funding for approved projects is derived from the taxes paid by boaters on the purchase of vessel gasoline and the repayment of principal and interest on department-made loans.

The department provides grants to a county, city, district or other public agency for the construction of small craft boating launching facilities and loans to local agencies for the construction of small craft harbors. These grants and loans require the consent of the Boating and Waterways Commission.



03/19/2013

Media Advisory
Boating and Waterways Commission to Consider
a $3.7 Million in Funding for Boating Facilities


Contact:  Gloria Sandoval (916) 651-5692

March 19, 2013


SACRAMENTO, Calif. - The California Boating and Waterways Commission will meet in Sacramento to consider $3.7 million in boating facility improvement grants and loans. The meeting is open to the public and will convene at 8:30 a.m. at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Sacramento 2001 Point West Way.

WHAT: Public Meeting – Boating and Waterways Commission

Items for consideration by the Commission include:

County of Los Angeles
Frank G. Bonelli Regional Park Sailboat Cove Boat Launching Facility
The Commission will consider approving a $400,000 grant to the County of Los Angeles for improvements to the Frank G. Bonelli Regional Park Sailboat Cove Boat Launching Facility. Proposed improvements include: demolition of the two existing boarding floats; construction of one new boarding float; and creation of an accessible path of travel from the accessible parking spaces to the launch ramp.

United States Army Corp of Engineers
Lake Mendocino South Bay Boat Launching Facility
The Commission will consider approving a $1.4 million grant to the United States Army Corp of Engineers for improvements to the Lake Mendocino South Bay Boat Launching Facility. Proposed improvements include the construction of a new parking area and addition of 63 parking spaces.

City of Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara Harbor – Marina One
The Commission will consider approving a $1.9 million loan to the City of Santa Barbara for improvements to Marina One of the Santa Barbara Harbor. Proposed improvements include the replacement of Fingers J and K (Phase 5) and the engineering phase of the replacement of Fingers A through K (Phase 5-8) of Marina One. These are a portion of the City of Santa Barbara’s Marina One Replacement Project; an eight phase, nine-year, full rehabilitation project of the Marina One headwalk and Fingers A through P.

WHEN:
Wednesday, Mar. 20 at 8:30 a.m.
 
WHERE: DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Sacramento
2001 Point West Way
Sacramento, CA 95814

A detailed agenda of the meeting and information on the commission may be found at http://www.dbw.ca.gov/Commission/.

Grant and loan applications are submitted to the Department of Boating and Waterways and funding for approved projects is derived from the taxes paid by boaters on the purchase of vessel gasoline and the repayment of principal and interest on department-made loans.

The department provides grants to a county, city, district or other public agency for the construction of small craft boating launching facilities and loans to local agencies for the construction of small craft harbors. These grants and loans require the consent of the
Boating and Waterways Commission.



03/15/2013

Media Advisory
Boating and Waterways Commission to Consider
a $3.7 Million in Funding for Boating Facilities


Contact:  Gloria Sandoval (916) 651-5692

March 19, 2013


SACRAMENTO, Calif. - The California Boating and Waterways Commission will meet in Sacramento to consider $3.7 million in boating facility improvement grants and loans. The meeting is open to the public and will convene at 8:30 a.m. at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Sacramento 2001 Point West Way.

WHAT: Public Meeting – Boating and Waterways Commission

Items for consideration by the Commission include:

County of Los Angeles
Frank G. Bonelli Regional Park Sailboat Cove Boat Launching Facility
The Commission will consider approving a $400,000 grant to the County of Los Angeles for improvements to the Frank G. Bonelli Regional Park Sailboat Cove Boat Launching Facility. Proposed improvements include: demolition of the two existing boarding floats; construction of one new boarding float; and creation of an accessible path of travel from the accessible parking spaces to the launch ramp.

United States Army Corp of Engineers
Lake Mendocino South Bay Boat Launching Facility
The Commission will consider approving a $1.4 million grant to the United States Army Corp of Engineers for improvements to the Lake Mendocino South Bay Boat Launching Facility. Proposed improvements include the construction of a new parking area and addition of 63 parking spaces.

City of Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara Harbor – Marina One
The Commission will consider approving a $1.9 million loan to the City of Santa Barbara for improvements to Marina One of the Santa Barbara Harbor. Proposed improvements include the replacement of Fingers J and K (Phase 5) and the engineering phase of the replacement of Fingers A through K (Phase 5-8) of Marina One. These are a portion of the City of Santa Barbara’s Marina One Replacement Project; an eight phase, nine-year, full rehabilitation project of the Marina One headwalk and Fingers A through P.

WHEN:
Wednesday, Mar. 20 at 8:30 a.m.
 
WHERE: DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Sacramento
2001 Point West Way
Sacramento, CA 95814

A detailed agenda of the meeting and information on the commission may be found at http://www.dbw.ca.gov/Commission/.

Grant and loan applications are submitted to the Department of Boating and Waterways and funding for approved projects is derived from the taxes paid by boaters on the purchase of vessel gasoline and the repayment of principal and interest on department-made loans.

The department provides grants to a county, city, district or other public agency for the construction of small craft boating launching facilities and loans to local agencies for the construction of small craft harbors. These grants and loans require the consent of the
Boating and Waterways Commission.



02/01/2013

Become a Dockwalker,
Help Keep California's Waterways Clean






Contact:  Gloria Sandoval (916) 651-5692

February 1, 2013

 



SACRAMENTO, Calif. - California’s Department of Boating and Waterways (DBW) and Coastal Commission’s Boating Clean and Green Program invite boaters to become Dockwalkers. Training is free and dockwalking is a fantastic way to interact with boaters to help keep California’s marinas, waterways and ocean clean and healthy.

“Working toward keeping California’s waterways free from environmental hazards such as oil, fuel, sewage, trash and marine debris is what drives volunteers to participate in the Dockwalker Program,” stated DBW’s Acting Director Lucia Becerra. “It is rewarding for them to know that their efforts now will help future generations enjoy clean waterways.”

The Dockwalker Program educates boaters to be safe and environmentally sound while boating in California through its volunteer Dockwalkers. The volunteers are trained to conduct face-to-face boater education and distribute boater kits with educational information while visiting marinas, boat launch ramps, boat shows and events. Hours spent training or educating the public qualify as community service.

Marinas and yacht clubs also benefit from the Dockwalker Program. Involvement in this program provides marinas and yacht clubs with the educational materials and tools to operate a clean boating facility and minimize water quality impacts.

To become a volunteer, please contact the program coordinator, Vivian Matuk, at (415) 904-6905 or visit www.BoatingCleanandGreen.com for more details and to view the 2013 Dockwalker Training Schedule.

Partnerships with the Santa Monica Bay Restoration Foundation (DBW Clean Vessel Act Program), the Keep the Delta Clean Program, the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, the U.S. Power Squadrons, and many more organizations have made this program successful. Since the year 2000, more than 700 volunteers have become Dockwalkers and more than 90,000 boater kits have been distributed throughout California.

 

The Boating Clean and Green Program is an education and outreach program conducted through the California Department of Boating and Waterways and California Coastal Commission. The program promotes environmentally-sound boating practices to marine business and boaters.


01/23/2013

Boating and Waterways Commission Approves $1.04 Million Grant to Upgrade Imperial County Boat Launching Facility
Improvements Will Make Boating at Wiest Lake Safer and More Convenient









Contact:  Gloria Sandoval (916) 651-5692

January 23, 2013


SACRAMENTO, Calif. - The California Boating and Waterways Commission today unanimously approved a $1.04 million grant for upgrades to the Wiest Lake boat launching facility in Imperial County.

Improvements to the facility will include replacement of the existing lakeshore shade structures, and resurfacing and expanding the existing parking area with a possible alternate exit. The project also plans to add a new boater restroom, boarding floats with gangways, new accessible pathways, and additional security lighting.


 

Grant and loan applications are submitted to the Department of Boating and Waterways and funding for approved projects is derived from the taxes paid by boaters on the purchase of vessel gasoline and the repayment of principal and interest on department-made loans.

The department provides grants to a county, city, district or other public agency for the construction of small craft boating launching facilities and loans to local agencies for the construction of small craft harbors. These grants and loans require the consent of the Boating and Waterways Commission.



01/17/2013


MEDIA ADVISORY
Boating and Waterways Commission to Consider a
$1.04 Million Boat Launching Facility Grant to Imperial County







Contact:  Gloria Sandoval (916) 651-5692

January 17, 2013


SACRAMENTO, Calif. - The California Boating and Waterways Commission will meet in Sacramento to consider a $1.04 million boat launching facility grant. The meeting is open to the public and will convene at 9:00 a.m. at the Courtyard Sacramento Cal Expo, 1782 Tribute Road.

WHAT: Public Meeting – Boating and Waterways Commission

The commission will consider approving a $1,040,000 grant to Imperial County for improvements to their Wiest Lake Boat Launching Facility. Proposed improvements include: demolition and replacement of the existing lakeshore shade structures (ramadas), resurfacing and striping the existing parking area, expanding the parking area with a possible alternate exit, adding a new boater restroom, boarding floats with gangways, adding accessible pathways, security lighting, and project signage.
   
WHEN: Wednesday, Jan. 23 at 9 a.m.
   
WHERE: Courtyard Marriott Sacramento Cal Expo
Golden State B
1782 Tribute Road
Sacramento, CA 95814

A detailed agenda of the meeting and information on the commission may be found at http://www.dbw.ca.gov/Commission/.

Grant and loan applications are submitted to the Department of Boating and Waterways and funding for approved projects is derived from the taxes paid by boaters on the purchase of vessel gasoline and the repayment of principal and interest on department-made loans.

The department provides grants to a county, city, district or other public agency for the construction of small craft boating launching facilities and loans to local agencies for the construction of small craft harbors. These grants and loans require the consent of the
Boating and Waterways Commission.